Podiatry

 

Podiatry focuses on preventing, diagnosing and treating conditions associated with the foot and ankle.

The Diabetes Podiatry service at CUH is a specialist tertiary referral centre provided to people suffering from diabetes-related foot complications. Diabetes can affect the lower limb in a number of ways, such as peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and peripheral vascular disease (including narrowing or blockage of blood vessels to the lower limb).  These complications increase a patient’s risk of developing Charcot’s arthropathy or ulcers. Ulcers are susceptible to infection, which may lead to foot sepsis, gangrene and, in some cases, amputation.

Studies have shown that amputation rates for patients with diabetes are between 15 to 40 times higher than that of the non-diabetic population. Audits carried out at CUH and international studies have indicated that the provision of a specialist diabetes podiatry service reduces the rate of amputations and hospital admissions among patients with diabetes.

 

Services Provided

The Diabetic Foot Clinic/Podiatry Department provides care specifically for patients with active diabetic foot disease. Patients are assessed for peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease. Treatments include advanced wound care and therapies and various casting techniques.  Please note:  There is no podiatry service currently available within CUH to provide care to non-diabetic patients with foot pathologies or to provide general routine foot-care. 

 

Access To Services

The Diabetic Foot Clinic accepts acute referrals directly from GPs, public health nurses, practice nurses and community podiatrists. Patients must be registered with the endocrinology department at CUH in order to access the service.

 

Contact Us

Podiatrists, Paula Gardiner, Emily Haworth, Eoin O'Farrell are based at the Diabetic Foot Clinic at Cork University Hospital and may be contacted on 021 4922658. 

 

Patient Information Leaflets

If you have a diagnosis of diabetes and your healthcare professional has advised you that you have a low riskof developing serious foot problems, you may find the following information leaflet useful:

http://www.hse.ie/eng/about/Who/clinical/natclinprog/diabetesprogramme/lowriskdiabetes.pdf

 

If you have a diagnosis of diabetes and your healthcare professional has advised you that you are at riskof developing serious diabetes-related foot problems, you may find the following information leaflet useful:

http://www.hse.ie/eng/about/Who/clinical/natclinprog/diabetesprogramme/midriskdiabetes.pdf

 

If you have a diagnosis of diabetes and your healthcare professional has advised you that you have a high riskof developing serious diabetes-associated foot problems, you may find the following information leaflet useful:

http://www.hse.ie/eng/about/Who/clinical/natclinprog/diabetesprogramme/highriskdiabetes.pdf